Moving games in Battle.net

Blizzard created a new gaming client called Battle.net. It’s just like the clients from Steam and Origin. It manages the games you have purchased/installed from them. One great thing that the Battle.net client has that, so far, Steam and Origin clients cannot do is to easily move installation location of games. It isn’t impossible, but requires a some research. With Battle.net, all you have to do is move the install directory from the source to destination. For instance, my C: drive is running low on space. I have Starcraft 2 installed in C:Program Files (x86)Starcraft 2. I just move that folder to D:Program Files (x86)Starcraft 2. Open up the Battle.net client and highlight the Starcraft 2 game. There will be an Install button on the bottom and right next to it that lets you look for the installation folder. Click on that and browse to the new location. That’s it! No more having to worry about DLL files not linking or registry entry getting corrupted – at least for these games. Hopefully, Steam and Origin follow Blizzard soon. As games get larger and larger, I don’t want to have to keep redownloading and reinstalling the games just to move it to another directory.

Amazon S3 and Glacier with Cloudberry S3 Explorer

I’ve been using Amazon S3 service for quite some time. It’s a cost effective service for backing up files in the cloud. You pretty much pay what you use. I mainly use S3 for backing up my photos – both digital and scanned. At the time I wrote this post (June 2013), I am using around 35GB of space. For the space, Amazon is charging me under $3 per month. There are other costs like bandwidth and requests but my bill for May 2013 was $3.30. So in 1 year, if my storage size doesn’t grow, I would have paid under $40. Not bad considering that they are storing files I can’t afford to lose. I also have local back ups.

I also use Amazon Glacier. This service is similar to S3 but it’s more for archiving purposes. Unlike S3, where files are readily available, files stored in Glacier require a few hours of waiting time before the files can be accessed and download. For this reason, this service is cost is a lot more lower than S3. I use this service to archive old family videos that I’ve captured from VHS, High8, and DV. Video files can get large but at the cost of a penny ($0.01) per GB, it’s worth using specially having a backup in the cloud. So as an example, based on May 2013, I have about 38GB of files stored with Glacier. Amazon charged me $0.54 – includes storage and requests fees.

So how do I get all my files into Amazon servers? Well, there’s a great software developed by Cloudberry calledS3 Explorer. It’s very easy to use. It works similarly to FTP client software. All you have to do is enter your login credentials for Amazon. You will get 2 window panes. The left will be your local. So you can browse your computer for the files you want to upload. The right pane is where you select your Amazon account from the drop down. It will then display your directory structure in Amazon. Just like the left pane, you can browse around to a location where you want to store the files. You can click and drag the files over or highlight the files you want to back up and click on the Copy button above. A window pane in the bottom will appear to display the transfer status. Not only is it easy to use, it’s also free.

After a few months of using the free version, I got a license for their pro version. I wanted to get more customization and play with the IAM manager. The multithreading upload is a great feature as well. I do many large file uploads and wanted to take advantage of this feature. You can check out the comparison chart.

I highly recommend using using Amazon’s cloud storage service. I also highly recommend using Cloudberry S3 Explorer with it. They are great together.

Upgrading my iMac MB324LL/A

My 320GB hard drive is starting to fill up on my iMac so I decided to get a 1TB hard drive. I knew opening the iMac is going to be a pain. I’ve seen videos from YouTube on how to open the previous plastic models and it looked hard. Nevertheless, I needed to upgrade my hard drive and I want someone else to do it. Besides, I wanted to know how to do it and do it myself. So the first thing I needed to do is look for videos on YouTube. I kept getting the plastic iMac model but kept searching. I found 2 pretty good videos: by lexusnut and by Zenn3k. Those were my starting point.

Update: their videos on Youtube are no longer there. I’ll keep their usernames in the post just to show credit.

It took my cousin and I two hours to finally access the motherboard area. I cannot stress enough on how careful you must be. Apple has placed wires in many areas where if you lift something quickly, you may pull it out of place or unplug it – leading to damaging your device. We documented the process and uploaded it on YouTube to help others.

My 320GB hard drive is starting to fill up on my iMac so I decided to get a 1TB hard drive. I knew opening the iMac is going to be a pain. I’ve seen videos from YouTube on how to open the previous plastic models and it looked hard. Nevertheless, I needed to upgrade my hard drive and I want someone else to do it. Besides, I wanted to know how to do it and do it myself. So the first thing I needed to do is look for videos on YouTube. I kept getting the plastic iMac model but kept searching. I found 2 pretty good videos: by lexusnut and by Zenn3k. Those were my starting point.

It took my cousin and I two hours to finally access the motherboard area. I cannot stress enough on how careful you must be. Apple has placed wires in many areas where if you lift something quickly, you may pull it out of place or unplug it – leading to damaging your device. We documented the process and uploaded it on YouTube to help others.

So now I got the new 1TB hard drive installed. How do I get my old system on the new drive? There are 2 ways to do this. The first way is to use Time Machine (if you actually did use it). You can install a fresh copy of Leopard on the new hard drive. After installation, you get an option to use a Time Machine back up to restore. I’ve tried this but since I have over 200GB of data, my iMac ends up sleeping while trying to load the data to restore.

The second option is the image the old hard drive and restore it on the new one. This option took me about a day to complete. What you will need is an external hard drive, your old hard, and the new hard drive. If you image your old drive before installing the new one, you don’t need a second external enclosure. The first thing you’ll do is to boot your computer using the Leopard DVD. Open Disc Utility on the Leopard DVD. Do not do this while booted on the hard drive. It’s possible that it will not work because the drive you are imaging is in use. The external hard drive is where you will save the image file. Once finished, restore the image onto the new hard drive. That’s pretty much a brief summary of what I did.

I did run into some errors while formatting the new hard drive. This post helped me outhttp://macosx.com/forums/hardware-peripherals/290989-disk-utility-problem-erasing-large-external-hard-drive.html.

The image/restore process took most of the day. It may be quicker or longer for you, depending on the size of the data. Make sure you take any necessary precautions before working on your expensive Apple hardware 😉

New upgrades for my Asus EEEPC 900A

After a few days with my netbook, I’ve decided to buy some upgrades to better my experience with it.

Here’s the video I posted on YouTube on installing the ram.

I didn’t bother posting another video for installing the new SSD drive because it’s fairly the same procedure as the ram upgrade.

Here’s the video where I got the idea to use the Case Logic HDC3 case.

Cost for all the upgrades were around $100. With the price of my netbook, it still cost less than the average startup price for a netbook.